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African Jigsaw Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

AFRICAN JIGSAW looks at the problems of urbanisation, its effects on tribal life and the casualties left in its wake. This is a complex problem facing most developing countries and the authors do not pretend the solution is a simple one, but examining the separate pieces of the jigsaw may help young and old alike to come to an understanding of the situation and, perhaps, to draw their own conclusions on its rights and wrongs.

Full with memorable tunes, this highly acclaimed work was broadcast on ITV and also won a Ford Conservation Award. Published in association with the World Wide Fund for Nature.

After The Beep Drama Australasian View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

A musical duologue, AFTER THE BEEP traces the lives of a 30ish couple after their relationship of five years ends. From the moment that Jason leaves Samantha behind in their flat the two of them never speak face to face, relying instead upon messages left on their answering machines to communicate.

Jason attempts to deal with the problems of having to move back home with his parents and Sam works her way through all the issues and problems her new found single status creates. This intimate musical comedy has been workshopped with the cast of Melissa Langton and Matt Hetherington under the direction of Gary Young.

Alice In Wonderland (Carl Davis) Drama; Fantasy/Adventure View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis
And The Big Men Fly - The Musical Comedy/Satire; Thriller/Mystery; Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

A play about, of all things… Australian Rules football!

This play by well-know Australian playwright, Alan Hopgood (author of “Weary”: the story of Sir Edward Dunlop; “The Carer” and “The Golden Legion of Cleaning Women” was premiered at the Russell Street Theatre in 1963 by the Melbourne Theatre Company.  This successful play ran for twelve weeks to capacity and was the first of the ‘footy’ plays, blazing the trail for “The Club” and those that followed.

In print, “And The Big Men Fly” has sold over 200,000 copies and has been studied by several generations of students.  It has stood the test of time, with revivals in Melbourne in 1988 and Adelaide in 1994

And now….the MUSICAL…… Alan Hopgood has teamed up with celebrated Australian composer Kevin Hocking to bring these wonderful characters to life again on stage.

Arabica Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

This Rose and Conlon musical looks at the international coffee market to show how developing countries are simply pawns in the money games played by the major industrial powers. Although we are encouraged to be more conscientious consumers, we still buy basic commodities at the supermarket with barely a thought to how they got there. The attractive shiny coffee packets we choose from disguise the fact that the people growing and picking this coffee are paid virtually nothing, and that their countries are bankrupt and at the mercy of the World Bank or the IMF. And yet how can it be that just about everyone else - coffee merchants, companies, speculators - profits from the enterprise? In ARABICA, Rose and Conlon bring us another powerful message that demands urgent attention.

Ballad of Salomon Pavey, The Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

The compelling story of two rival groups of boy actors at court during the reign of the Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I. Salomon Pavey, an outstanding young actor with a flair for playing the parts of old men, unwittingly becomes involved in the politics of the Royal Court with tragic results - a victim not only of his enemies, but also of his success. A ballad opera that uses popular music of the period, capturing beautifully the spirit of the Elizabethan age.

Bed and Sofa Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

In Moscow, in 1926, a housing crisis rages. In a cramped apartment, Ludmilla, a put-upon housewife, lives in dreamy complacency with her cheerful despot of a husband, Kolya. When one day, Kolya's handsome comrade, Volodya, arrives from the country, but can find no lodgings, Kolya offers him their sofa. When Kolya returns early from a business trip, he is shocked to discover that Ludmilla and Volodya have become lovers. Kolya moves out, but there is still nowhere to live, so he reluctantly returns, taking the sofa, leaving Ludmilla and Volodya the bed. Kolya stalls the new couple's lovemaking with endless games of checkers, so that slowly, to Ludmilla's frustration, Volodya becomes more interested in the manly sport of checkers than in sex. Finally, Volodya reveals himself to be just as much a domestic despot as Kolya. So Ludmilla banishes Volodya to the sofa and takes the bed for herself. Ludmilla's "marriage" to the two men has already had its consequence as she is pregnant. The two men bicker over who is the father and finally decree: Ludmilla must have an abortion. Acquiescing, Ludmilla waits her turn in a frighteningly efficient clinic. But seeing a living, breathing baby out the window convinces her to leave, without the procedure. She packs up and abandons her two "husbands," declaring them unworthy to be fathers, and Kolya and Volodya find themselves alone in the close Moscow flat. They have no choice: As Ludmilla rides alone into the exciting unknown, Kolya takes the bed and Volodya the sofa.

One of the most acclaimed productions of its season, this enchanting three-character "silent movie opera" based on Abram Room's scandalous 1926 Russian film comedy, premiered at the Vineyard Theatre in New York, where it received an Obie award for its composer, Polly Pen (Goblin Market), and seven Drama Desk nominations, including Best Musical. With witty book and lyrics by Laurence Klavan (Freud's House, Sleeping Beauty, Gorgo's Mother). "A delight! First rate! A classy treat! A new work that both honors the original and gives it a sternly funny stage life of its own." —NY Times. "Wonderful! A must see! So perfectly done it is almost unfair to the rackety hacks who infest our musical theater." —Village Voice. "Enchanting! Exquisite! A wholly original piece of musical theatre!" —NY Newsday. "Fresh and endearing! As original as it is impudent! The show has jaunty music by Polly Pen and a jazzy text by Laurence Klavan." —NY Magazine.  

Beggar Student, The Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Naples, 1840. A rascally Colonel in the Austrian Army of Occupation plans revenge on a girl who has rebuffed him - Laura, one of the two daughters of an impoverished Italian Countess. He releases two young prisoners on condition they masquerade as a wealthy Prince and his secretary. The ‘Prince’ has to win Laura’s hand, and then humiliate her. How the young men fall in love with the two girls and completely turn the tables on the Colonel is splendidly told in this tuneful operetta.

Beggar's Opera Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

John Gay's great comic masterpiece is generally agreed to be the first ever musical. Written in 1728, THE BEGGAR'S OPERA is a savagely funny satire on marriage, money and morals—as relevant and biting today as it was when first written. In this new version by John Caird and Ilona Sekacz, the old story is given new life as all our favorite characters return, in a play within a play, where beggars and thieves create a world of love, lust, violence, deceit, greed and a little more love. Ilona Sekacz's score uses all the old tunes, but brings them up to date in a superb synthesis of eighteenth and twentieth-century musical styles. John Caird's stage directions make the old text sizzle with life, giving a clear context for Gay's ruthless characters and driving the convoluted plot at a helter-skelter pace. Peachum, a purveyor of stolen goods, and his rapacious wife, are horrified to find that their only child, Polly, has fallen in love with, and worse still married, Captain Macheath, the famous highwayman. Peachum cannot bear the thought that Macheath should get control of Polly's money and become the heir to his own fortune, so he plots to have Macheath captured and hanged. Act One ends with Macheath emerging from his hiding place (in Polly's bed) and the lovers swearing eternal fidelity to each other as Macheath flies to safety. Macheath is arrested and imprisoned by the corrupt jailer, Lockit, whose daughter Lucy turns out to be another of Macheath's lovers, now heavily pregnant with his child. Polly's prison visit to her husband causes an embarrassing and ludicrous collision between the two women who fight viciously for Macheath's affection. Polly is dragged away by her father and Lucy helps Macheath escape. Act Two closes with both women grieving for their departed man. Act Three sees Macheath re-arrested and as the story enters into ever more dark and political territory, Gay uses Macheath's plight to talk about injustice and poverty wherever and whenever it occurs. After a heartbreaking trio as Macheath and his two wives—and then a few more—bid farewell, Macheath is hanged. There follows a stunning and hilarious coup de theatre, as the public objects to the tragic turn of events. Macheath's hanging is "reversed," and the company of beggars improvise a joyful and shambolic happy ending.

"…with Ilona Sekacz's complete musical overhaul, [Caird] raises the dramatic fever of the score to match Gay's wonderfully savage and scabrous script." —Observer (London). "Fresh as milk, horny as hell, a dream, a nightmare, a cross-section of an ant hill, John Gay's BEGGAR'S OPERA is like life. It is beautiful, it is there, and it goes on. And, in John Caird's sensationally seductive production you never want it to end…Here's variety before the word was invented." —Midweek Magazine. "THE BEGGAR'S OPERA…is obviously full of zest and fascination…There is so much life and vigour in the whole thing…It was absolutely spell-binding…" —Oxford Magazine.  

Betty Blue Eyes Comedy/Satire; Drama; Romance View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Belts are being tightened and the country’s long-suffering citizens are being told by the government that there will be fair shares for all in return for surviving Austerity Britain. Meanwhile local officials feather their own nests by taking far more than their own fair share. It is of course 1947, and having won the war Britain seems to have lost the peace, and the country is staggering under the burden of acute rationing, unemployment and the coldest winter for decades. The only bright spark on the horizon is the impending marriage of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip.

Twenty six years ago Alan Bennett and Malcolm Mowbray wove this story into a hilariously funny but sharply observed comic film called ‘A Private Function’, which centred around Betty, an adorable pig, who is being illegally reared to ensure the local dignitaries can celebrate the Royal Wedding with a lavish banquet while the local population make do with Spam. Ron Cowen and Daniel Lipman have brilliantly adapted and expanded this story for the stage and George Stiles and Anthony Drewe have written a deliciously infectious, toe-tapping, retro contemporary score. The result is an utterly British musical, full of eccentric characters, such as the strange odd couple, Gilbert – an evangelistic chiropodist, and Joyce – a nobody determined to be somebody; Inspector Wormold - an obsessive destroyer of illegal meat; Mother Dear – ‘She’s seventy four and ravenous’; along with a weird assortment of bullies, spivs and snobs and of course, our star, Betty the pig.

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