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And The Big Men Fly - The Musical Comedy/Satire; Thriller/Mystery; Drama View Details Compare
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A play about, of all things… Australian Rules football!

This play by well-know Australian playwright, Alan Hopgood (author of “Weary”: the story of Sir Edward Dunlop; “The Carer” and “The Golden Legion of Cleaning Women” was premiered at the Russell Street Theatre in 1963 by the Melbourne Theatre Company.  This successful play ran for twelve weeks to capacity and was the first of the ‘footy’ plays, blazing the trail for “The Club” and those that followed.

In print, “And The Big Men Fly” has sold over 200,000 copies and has been studied by several generations of students.  It has stood the test of time, with revivals in Melbourne in 1988 and Adelaide in 1994

And now….the MUSICAL…… Alan Hopgood has teamed up with celebrated Australian composer Kevin Hocking to bring these wonderful characters to life again on stage.

Arabica Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

This Rose and Conlon musical looks at the international coffee market to show how developing countries are simply pawns in the money games played by the major industrial powers. Although we are encouraged to be more conscientious consumers, we still buy basic commodities at the supermarket with barely a thought to how they got there. The attractive shiny coffee packets we choose from disguise the fact that the people growing and picking this coffee are paid virtually nothing, and that their countries are bankrupt and at the mercy of the World Bank or the IMF. And yet how can it be that just about everyone else - coffee merchants, companies, speculators - profits from the enterprise? In ARABICA, Rose and Conlon bring us another powerful message that demands urgent attention.

Babes In The Wood (Denys & Harris) Fantasy/Adventure View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Premiering at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre, Babes in the Wood is a traditional family pantomime following the attempts of the evil Sheriff of Nottingham to kidnap the Babes from under the watchful eye of Nurse Nellie. With a little help from the Fairy Tweet, Robin Hood, Maid Marian and Robin's band of Merry Men rescue the Babes from the Sheriff's clutches and save the day! Complete technical material for sets, props, lighting and special effects are included.  

Babes In The Wood (Webster) Fantasy/Adventure View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

When the King and Queen of Bohemia leave Count Tofifty in charge of the castle when they tour the Kingdom, things don't look too good for the two babes! The Count has fleeced his estates and now sees the chance for more, so when Robin of Loxley tries to warn the court he's banished from the Kingdom into the woods. In the custody of their dotty Nanny, the Prince and Princess are soon lost in the forest - with a little help from the Count and his henchmen, of course! Soon, the trio meet the banished Robin and his band of men, and together with a superb combination of romance, swashbuckloing adventure and loads of comedy, the outlaws seek revege to save the Kingdom.  Available in a volume with "Dick Turpin". 

Bad Girls - The Musical Comedy/Satire View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

BAD GIRLS is a fresh, funny and original British musical, based on characters from the award winning and hugely popular television drama.

Set in the fictional HMP Larkhall, it’s the story of new idealistic Wing Governor Helen Stewart and her battles with the entrenched old guard of Officer Jim Fenner and his sidekick Sylvia Hollamby. It also follows the love story that develops between Helen and charismatic inmate Nikki Wade. Other featured characters include Shell Dockley and her runner Denny Blood, old-timer Noreen Biggs, The Two Julies and the ultimate Top Dog, King-of-Gangland’s missus, Yvonne Atkins. A tragic death on the wing - in which Jim Fenner is implicated - leads to an angry protest from the women and forces Helen and Nikki to their opposite sides of the bars. But when it’s clear that Helen stands to lose her job over Jim Fenner’s misdeeds, the race is on for the women to nail Jim once and for all.

Ballad of Salomon Pavey, The Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

The compelling story of two rival groups of boy actors at court during the reign of the Virgin Queen, Elizabeth I. Salomon Pavey, an outstanding young actor with a flair for playing the parts of old men, unwittingly becomes involved in the politics of the Royal Court with tragic results - a victim not only of his enemies, but also of his success. A ballad opera that uses popular music of the period, capturing beautifully the spirit of the Elizabethan age.

Bat Boy: The Musical Comedy/Satire View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

"Big laughs…It's remarkable what intelligent wit can accomplish—a jaggedly imaginative mix of skewering humor and energetic glee." —NY Times.

"Smart, playful and funny…a giggling cult hit" —NY Magazine.

"Outrageously silly and totally charming." —NY Daily News.

"At the end of the show, you've been gleefully, outlandishly entertained." —NY Newsday.

"Composed with smarts, staged with savvy and performed with gusto, BAT BOY: THE MUSICAL is a winner. You'd be batty to miss it." —Star Ledger.

Bed and Sofa Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

In Moscow, in 1926, a housing crisis rages. In a cramped apartment, Ludmilla, a put-upon housewife, lives in dreamy complacency with her cheerful despot of a husband, Kolya. When one day, Kolya's handsome comrade, Volodya, arrives from the country, but can find no lodgings, Kolya offers him their sofa. When Kolya returns early from a business trip, he is shocked to discover that Ludmilla and Volodya have become lovers. Kolya moves out, but there is still nowhere to live, so he reluctantly returns, taking the sofa, leaving Ludmilla and Volodya the bed. Kolya stalls the new couple's lovemaking with endless games of checkers, so that slowly, to Ludmilla's frustration, Volodya becomes more interested in the manly sport of checkers than in sex. Finally, Volodya reveals himself to be just as much a domestic despot as Kolya. So Ludmilla banishes Volodya to the sofa and takes the bed for herself. Ludmilla's "marriage" to the two men has already had its consequence as she is pregnant. The two men bicker over who is the father and finally decree: Ludmilla must have an abortion. Acquiescing, Ludmilla waits her turn in a frighteningly efficient clinic. But seeing a living, breathing baby out the window convinces her to leave, without the procedure. She packs up and abandons her two "husbands," declaring them unworthy to be fathers, and Kolya and Volodya find themselves alone in the close Moscow flat. They have no choice: As Ludmilla rides alone into the exciting unknown, Kolya takes the bed and Volodya the sofa.

One of the most acclaimed productions of its season, this enchanting three-character "silent movie opera" based on Abram Room's scandalous 1926 Russian film comedy, premiered at the Vineyard Theatre in New York, where it received an Obie award for its composer, Polly Pen (Goblin Market), and seven Drama Desk nominations, including Best Musical. With witty book and lyrics by Laurence Klavan (Freud's House, Sleeping Beauty, Gorgo's Mother). "A delight! First rate! A classy treat! A new work that both honors the original and gives it a sternly funny stage life of its own." —NY Times. "Wonderful! A must see! So perfectly done it is almost unfair to the rackety hacks who infest our musical theater." —Village Voice. "Enchanting! Exquisite! A wholly original piece of musical theatre!" —NY Newsday. "Fresh and endearing! As original as it is impudent! The show has jaunty music by Polly Pen and a jazzy text by Laurence Klavan." —NY Magazine.  

Beggar Student, The Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Naples, 1840. A rascally Colonel in the Austrian Army of Occupation plans revenge on a girl who has rebuffed him - Laura, one of the two daughters of an impoverished Italian Countess. He releases two young prisoners on condition they masquerade as a wealthy Prince and his secretary. The ‘Prince’ has to win Laura’s hand, and then humiliate her. How the young men fall in love with the two girls and completely turn the tables on the Colonel is splendidly told in this tuneful operetta.

Beggar's Opera Drama View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

John Gay's great comic masterpiece is generally agreed to be the first ever musical. Written in 1728, THE BEGGAR'S OPERA is a savagely funny satire on marriage, money and morals—as relevant and biting today as it was when first written. In this new version by John Caird and Ilona Sekacz, the old story is given new life as all our favorite characters return, in a play within a play, where beggars and thieves create a world of love, lust, violence, deceit, greed and a little more love. Ilona Sekacz's score uses all the old tunes, but brings them up to date in a superb synthesis of eighteenth and twentieth-century musical styles. John Caird's stage directions make the old text sizzle with life, giving a clear context for Gay's ruthless characters and driving the convoluted plot at a helter-skelter pace. Peachum, a purveyor of stolen goods, and his rapacious wife, are horrified to find that their only child, Polly, has fallen in love with, and worse still married, Captain Macheath, the famous highwayman. Peachum cannot bear the thought that Macheath should get control of Polly's money and become the heir to his own fortune, so he plots to have Macheath captured and hanged. Act One ends with Macheath emerging from his hiding place (in Polly's bed) and the lovers swearing eternal fidelity to each other as Macheath flies to safety. Macheath is arrested and imprisoned by the corrupt jailer, Lockit, whose daughter Lucy turns out to be another of Macheath's lovers, now heavily pregnant with his child. Polly's prison visit to her husband causes an embarrassing and ludicrous collision between the two women who fight viciously for Macheath's affection. Polly is dragged away by her father and Lucy helps Macheath escape. Act Two closes with both women grieving for their departed man. Act Three sees Macheath re-arrested and as the story enters into ever more dark and political territory, Gay uses Macheath's plight to talk about injustice and poverty wherever and whenever it occurs. After a heartbreaking trio as Macheath and his two wives—and then a few more—bid farewell, Macheath is hanged. There follows a stunning and hilarious coup de theatre, as the public objects to the tragic turn of events. Macheath's hanging is "reversed," and the company of beggars improvise a joyful and shambolic happy ending.

"…with Ilona Sekacz's complete musical overhaul, [Caird] raises the dramatic fever of the score to match Gay's wonderfully savage and scabrous script." —Observer (London). "Fresh as milk, horny as hell, a dream, a nightmare, a cross-section of an ant hill, John Gay's BEGGAR'S OPERA is like life. It is beautiful, it is there, and it goes on. And, in John Caird's sensationally seductive production you never want it to end…Here's variety before the word was invented." —Midweek Magazine. "THE BEGGAR'S OPERA…is obviously full of zest and fascination…There is so much life and vigour in the whole thing…It was absolutely spell-binding…" —Oxford Magazine.  

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