Showing 1 - 10 of 23
No. of results per page
First  |  Page  1  2  3  |   Last
Title Genre Cast Size Actions / Compare
After the Fall Drama 23 (12m, 11f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

As Howard Taubman outlines the play: "At the outset Quentin emerges, moves forward and seats himself on the edge of the stage and begins to talk, like a man confiding in a friend. In the background are key figures in his life, and they move in and out of his narrative. The narration shades into scenes, little and big. They are revelations and illuminations. They remind Quentin of an awkward young girl whom he made proud of herself. They bring the tortured image of his mother's death and another of his mother's fury with his father, who lost all in trying to save a floundering business. They crisscross through his relations with a number of women—the first wife who wanted to be a separate person, the second who drove him into a separateness and a possible third who knew, as a German raised in a furnace of concentration camps, that 'survival can be hard to bear.' These intertwining images bring back the memories of inquisition when men were asked to name names of those who had joined with them in a communism that they mistook for a better future…AFTER THE FALL is a pain-wracked drama; it is also Mr. Miller's maturest…For to sit in Mr. Miller's theater is to be in an adult world concerned with a search that cuts to the bone."

The initial offering of New York's Lincoln Center Repertory Theater. A powerful and moving study of a contemporary man struggling to come to terms with himself and his world by probing back into the revealing and often painful events of his past. "Rejoice that Arthur Miller is back with a play worthy of his mettle." —NY Times. "A beautiful, remarkable play." —NY World-Telegram & Sun. "…strong, moving, and perceptive…" —NY Post.     

All My Sons Drama 10 (6m, 4f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

During the war Joe Keller and Herbert Deever ran a machine shop which made airplane parts. Deever was sent to prison because the firm turned out defective parts, causing the deaths of many men. Keller went free and made a lot of money. The twin shadows of this catastrophe and the fact that the young Keller son was reported missing during the war dominate the action. The love affair of Chris Keller and Ann Deever, the bitterness of George Deever returned from the war to find his father in prison and his father's partner free, are all set in a structure of almost unbearable power. The climax showing the reaction of a son to his guilty father is fitting conclusion to a play electrifying in its intensity.

A tremendously impressive drama that received the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Play. 

American Clock, The Drama 24 (15m, 9f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Subtitled "a mural for the theatre," the play employs a series of vignettes and short scenes, with the actors portraying some fifty-two characters, to capture the sense and substance of America in the throes of the Great Depression. The central figures are the Baums, a wealthy family whose fortune has vanished in the stock market crash, but their story is amplified and illuminated by brief glimpses of other lives; a farmer who has lost all in the dust bowl; a prostitute who exchanges her favors for dental work; a white Southern sheriff in thrall to a black short-order cook; a young man who dreams of success on Tin Pan Alley, etc. Moving deftly from scene to scene, some funny, some movingly poignant, the play becomes a deeply affecting evocation both of a tortured time in American history and of the indomitable spirit of the people who survived and prevailed in the face of unaccustomed adversity.

Presented at the Spoleto Festival in Charleston, South Carolina, and then on Broadway, this brilliantly theatrical, kaleidoscopic study of America during the early years of the Great Depression constitutes a major work by one of our theatre's truly important writers. "After far too long an interlude, Arthur Miller is back in touch with his best subject, the failure of the American dream, and back on top of his talent." —NY Times. "…the same kind of intimate, inner-voice writing that made DEATH OF A SALESMAN a masterpiece." —NY Post. "It's warm, funny, interesting…" —Variety.     

Archbishop's Ceiling, The Drama 5 (3m, 2f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

The setting is an ornate room in a former Archbishop's palace in an Eastern European capital, a room which has probably been bugged by the secret police. The central character is a middle-aged author, Sigmund, who, having embarrassed the current regime, is faced with the choice of detention and punishment or defection to the West. He is encouraged in the latter by two of his former friends, also writers, his compatriot Marcus, an ex-political prisoner now in favor with the regime, and Adrian, a visiting American with strongly liberal ideals. The situation is complicated by the presence of Myra, a poet and actress, who has been the mistress of all three. It is the complexity of the relationship of these four, the inextricable interweaving of politics, art and sex, and the constant uncertainty as to whether what they say may be overheard that makes for a rich and deeply intriguing play—and one that, in the final essence, raises questions not only about morality and individual responsibility but also about the very nature of reality in a world where absolutes seem to shift and blur as expediency dictates.

A powerful, probing work by our theatre's master dramatist. Never before made available for general production, the play explores the dilemma of the creative artist in a totalitarian society by examining the relationship between four writers, friends of long standing, and the manner in which their lives have been affected by their defiance of—or acceptance of—state doctrines. 

Broken Glass Drama 6 (3m, 3f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Brooklyn, New York. The end of November, 1938. Sylvia Gellberg has suddenly, mysteriously, become paralyzed from the waist down. As the play opens, her husband, Phillip, and her doctor, Dr. Hyman, meet to discuss the prognosis and test results. The doctor assures Phillip that physically, there is nothing wrong with his wife and that she is sane, but advises the only way to discover the cause of her paralysis is to probe into her psyche. At this point, the author begins to peel away all the layers of the characters' lives in this stunning, deeply effective exploration of what it means to be American and Jewish in 1938. In his attempts to uncover the truth about Sylvia's paralysis, Dr. Hyman, via conversations with Phillip, Sylvia, and her sister, Harriet, discovers that the Gellberg's marriage was built on resentment and that over the years has become loveless. While Sylvia's affliction leaves her terrified, it exposes Phillip's deepest emotions. He hates himself, and he loathes being Jewish. His self-hatred has always made him cold, and at times even cruel, yet, Sylvia's condition has magnified his feelings leaving him out of control with her, with Dr. Hyman and even with his employers. Dr. Hyman's obsessive determination to cure Sylvia leads him to discover that her paralysis occurred quickly after a newspaper report on Krystallnacht and an accompanying photograph of two old men forced to clean the streets of Germany with toothbrushes. She feels something must be done to stop the Nazis while most Americans believe the Germans won't allow them to get out of hand. But what can she do when she can't even change her own life? The atrocities in Germany, her husband's denial of his Jewishness and her own realization that she threw her life away have overcome her. Suddenly, she no longer simply feels helpless, she has truly become helpless. Finally, with everyone's feelings laid bare, the play comes to its heart-wrenching, electrifying conclusion, as Phillip has a heart attack and begs Sylvia's forgiveness as he dies.

Winner of the 1995 Laurence Olivier Award. The production of BROKEN GLASS at the Booth Theatre is Arthur Miller's landmark fiftieth anniversary since his debut on Broadway in 1944. "In a metier where people burn out fast, Arthur Miller is still remarkable for the acuity and scope of his moral vision. Miller's voice, which remains as strong and unrelenting as a prophet's, distinguishes BROKEN GLASS and gives it a poignance so rare these days that it's almost new-fashioned." —NY Times. "Playwrights tend to burn out young, so the fact that Arthur Miller, seventy-eight, opened a new drama on Broadway fifty years after his debut, is noteworthy. Even better, the play is good—complex, mysterious, full of arresting incident, grippingly played." —Time Magazine.

Clara Drama 4 (3m, 1f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

CLARA, is a powerful and moving drama in which an aging father is forced to come to grips with the crushing reality of his daughter's senseless murder. Grilled relentlessly by a dispassionate detective, the father is unable to bring his memory into focus until, in the trenchant monologue recalling a disquieting incident from his wartime experience, the past suddenly clarifies the present and, relieving the father's tortured conscience, unlocks the damning evidence which the detective has been seeking.

"Arthur Miller is the American Ibsen" —Time Magazine. "It is truly an event when a playwright of his stature takes to the public stage after a long absence." —NY Post. "Arthur Miller's admirable voice of conscience remains firm as always." —NY Times 

Creation of the World and Other Business, The Comedy/Satire; Drama 9 (8m, 1f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Dividing his play into "three questions on the human dilemma," the author begins with a charming and gently humorous retelling of Adam and Eve (and God) in the Garden of Eden. After their expulsion from paradise, Eve gives birth to Cain, watched over by a scheming Lucifer—who seeks to share the power of a God now angered by the errant ways of his creations. In the concluding portion of the play, with mounting dramatic intensity, Cain kills his brother, Abel, and is sent out as a wanderer, as the final dilemma is explored: "When every man wants justice, why does he go on creating injustice?" Throughout the action, which alternates scenes of sprightly humor with absorbing confrontations between God and Lucifer and God and his fallible creations, the striking pertinence of the play becomes ever more clear. It is a parable for our time, and all time, rich with philosophic insights and alive with vivid theatricality.

An important and remarkable play by a master dramatist which, with eloquence and compassionate humor, goes to the very roots of human guilt and responsibility: the Biblical struggle between God and Lucifer, with Adam and Eve and Cain and Abel as their pawns. "…the sparkle, intellectual bite and stimulating impact that a new dissertation on an ageless subject should have." —Variety. "…Miller is reaching for new insights into the human dilemma…" —Cue Magazine. "…imagination and an unexpected vein of humor…" —NY Post. 

Crucible, The Drama 20 (10m, 10f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

The story focuses upon a young farmer, his wife, and a young servant-girl who maliciously causes the wife's arrest for witchcraft. The farmer brings the girl to court to admit the lie—and it is here that the monstrous course of bigotry and deceit is terrifyingly depicted. The farmer, instead of saving his wife, finds himself also accused of witchcraft and ultimately condemned with a host of others.

Winner of the 1953 Tony Award for Best Play. This exciting drama about the Puritan purge of witchcraft in old Salem is both a gripping historical play and a timely parable of our contemporary society.

"A powerful drama." —NY Times.

"Strongly written." —NY Daily News.

Death of a Salesman Drama 13 (8m, 5f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

The story revolves around the last days of Willy Loman, a failing salesman, who cannot understand how he failed to win success and happiness. Through a series of tragic soul-searching revelations of the life he has lived with his wife, his sons, and his business associates, we discover how his quest for the "American Dream" kept him blind to the people who truly loved him. A thrilling work of deep and revealing beauty that remains one of the most profound classic dramas of the American theatre.

Winner of the 1949 Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award for Best Play.

Elegy for a Lady Drama 2 (1m, 1f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

A Man enters a small boutique, hoping to find a suitable gift for his young mistress, who is facing a grave operation. Unaccountably he quickly finds himself confiding in the Proprietress, speaking without hesitation of the pain he feels at having his telephone calls to his loved one unreturned, of his fear that her condition may be fatal. The Proprietress consoles him, suggesting that perhaps she wants to spare him, that she needs to face her ordeal alone and without added burden that his involvement would impose. As they speak specters of other deep-seated concerns arise: the difference in age between the Man and his mistress; his unfulfilling marriage; the emptiness of material success without love to enrich it; the void that might have been filled had there been the possibility of children; the frustration of being unable to make a true and total commitment to another person. It is almost as though the Proprietress might be—or has become—the absent mistress. As the play ends the Man and the Proprietress embrace, two strangers grateful for the small miracle which, if only for a brief moment, has let them share closeness always hoped for but seldom achieved.

A haunting and evocative study of loss, and the pain of love and rejection, by one of our theatre's master writers.    

Showing 1 - 10 of 23
No. of results per page
First  |  Page  1  2  3  |   Last
Compare

Compare (up to 3 items)

Start
Comparison