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49th Cousin, The Comedy/Satire 10 (7m, 3f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

As outlined in the New York Mirror, "It is based on [Lowe's] reminiscences of her late grandfather…Isaac Lowe was a cantankerous, opinionated man. He founded a synagogue in Syracuse at the turn of the century, and almost wrecked it. His possessiveness and prejudice kept his three daughters on the verge of spinsterhood until they revolted against his tyrannical ways. Being of German Jewish stock, Isaac looked down on Russians, Poles, Austrians and Hungarians. When one of his daughters defied him and married a young Russian salesman, he was irate. He was even more so when another became engaged to a Gentile school principle. Isaac thought the Lord had deserted him. He tried to turn atheist. But in the end, everything came out all right. The generosity of others made him see the error of his ways. A lightning bolt that hit the temple also helped…The title refers to the fact that if we believe in Adam and Eve, we're all cousins—forty-ninth or farther removed."

"The people…are such a truly sweet lot…that I'd like to think that they were still carrying on, somewhere, after the curtain has gone down." —NY Herald-Tribune. "…exceedingly funny lines…" —NY Newsday.   

Father of the Bride Comedy/Satire 18 (11m, 7f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Mr. Banks learns that one of the young men he has seen occasionally about the house is about to become his son-in-law. Daughter Kay announces the engagement out of nowhere. Mrs. Banks and her sons are happy, but Mr. Banks is in a dither. The groom-to-be, Buckley Dunstan, appears on the scene and Mr. Banks realizes that the engagement is serious. Buckley and Kay don't want a "big" wedding—just a simple affair with a few friends! We soon learn, however, that the "few" friends idea is out. Then trouble really begins. The guest list grows larger each day, a caterer is called in, florists, furniture movers and dressmakers take over, and the Banks household is soon caught in turmoil—not to mention growing debt. When Kay, in a fit of temper, calls off the wedding, everyone's patience snaps. But all is set right, and the wedding (despite more last-minute crises) comes off beautifully. In the end, the father of the bride is a happy, proud man, glad that the wedding is over, but knowing too that it was worth all the money and aggravation to start his daughter off so handsomely on the road to married life.

     

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