Showing 1 - 4 of 4
No. of results per page
First  |  Page  1  |   Last
Title Genre Cast Size Actions / Compare
Adam Baum and the Jew Movie Comedy/Satire; Drama 3 (3m, 0f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Hollywood, 1946. Jewish movie mogul Sam Baum prepares to give notes to Gentile screenwriter Garfield Hampson on his screenplay about anti-Semitism. Time is of the essence. Zanuck at Fox has his own "Jew Movie," Gentleman's Agreement, and America can only take one. Gar arrives, excited and optimistic. Sam chats him up, but then gets to the point: The script is too Jewish; Gar has written it "as a Jew, and not as a Gentile." The men argue about the script, about what it means to be American, what it means to be Jewish. Sam invites Gar to his son Adam's Bar Mitzvah, so he can see what Jews are really like. Late Saturday night, the Bar Mitzvah is winding down, and Sam slips into his study. Adam appears, in his plaid suit and yarmulke. Sam takes the yarmulke from him. Adam asks if he can sing him his portion. Sam refuses, gives his son a "shake hand lesson" instead. Gar appears, a little drunk, with a present for Adam: tools. Adam leaves. Sam asks Gar what he's learned from the Bar Mitzvah. Gar is appalled by it. Sam calls him a communist. Adam appears. Sam asks him to drop his pants to show Gar what makes him Jewish. Adam runs off. All is lost. Sam and Gar cannot get on the same page. Gar asks if Sam's fear is about money. Sam calls Gar a "Jew hater," and finally understands the genius of Zanuck, hiring Moss Hart, a Jew, to write Gentleman's Agreement. "Only a Jew could write a Jew and not think of writing a Jew." The movie is off. Gar leaves, devastated. Adam returns. Sam apologizes to him, and asks him to sing his portion. Adam sings as Sam weeps.

"Stocked with uneasy questions about self-deception and self-hatred." —Time Magazine. "Comic genius." —Variety. "The script has a complexity that is rare by today's dumb-and-dumber standards. Here, after all, is a play that understands just how insidious prejudice is and also how racist attitudes can be lurking in the most unexpected places." —NY Daily News. 

Cradle and All Comedy/Satire 2 (1m, 1f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

Relationships aren't baby-proof. Annie and Nate have a baby who won't sleep. Claire and Luke are losing sleep over the decision to start a family. In adjacent Brooklyn Heights apartments, Daniel Goldfarb's fresh and witty look at love, sex, commitment and parenthood unfolds, and no one will rest until the truth between each of these couples is spoken.

"CRADLE AND ALL is a smart, pitch-perfect play that is a cut-to-the-bone look at how babies can expose secrets their parents want hidden. With evident humor, Goldfarb has churned up all those little things that drive couples crazy. The play often feels so true that it becomes universal." —Associated Press. "Daniel Goldfarb insightfully lampoons the instincts of contemporary urban parents." —NY Times. "CRADLE rocks!" —amNewYork. "Thoughtful, amusing and shrewd, with characters that surprise you and deepen." —NY Daily News. "A daring and engaging evening. Utterly natural and emotionally true. Daniel Goldfarb has an insightful grasp on the way people in a relationship behave." —The Record. "An excellent showcase and a sure bet to entertain audiences." —BackStage. "Engaging and perceptive." —Time Out NY.   

Modern Orthodox Comedy/Satire; Romance 4 (2m, 2f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

In a Manhattan coffee shop, Ben, an Upper West Side financial consultant, meets Hershel, an Orthodox jewel merchant, to buy an engagement ring. Although both men are Jewish, it is their shared religion that instantly divides them. Tension mounts in the midst of the deal when Ben suggests Hershel remove his yarmulke. Desperate to make the sale, Hershel obliges. In the apartment they share, Ben proposes to his girlfriend, Hannah, a sensitive yet stong-minded doctor. Hannah accepts, but the moment is muddled by mixed emotions for each of them and the sudden and unexpected arrival of Hershel on their doorstep! Frantic and frenzied, Hershel recounts that since he removed his yarmulke, his life has fallen apart. Hershel moves in with Ben and Hannah and they begin the task of putting his life back together—by finding him a bride. A modern couple, they turn to the Internet for matchmaker. On Shabbat, Hannah arrives home from a long day at the hospital, upset. Although Hershel has never been alone with a woman before, he offers Hannah comfort and support, which leads to a kiss. Hershel goes out on his first date with Rachel, the online suitor. As Hershel discovers his love for Rachel, Ben and Hannah rediscover their love. Three months later, Ben and Hershel meet again, as changed men, no longer divided by their faith. They have learned something from each other, and each couple is ready to embark on married life; one beginning as Orthodox virgins, the other as modern parents-to-be.

"Daniel Goldfarb has written an adorable romantic comedy—with honest to G-d belly laughs—about love and sex and faith and friendship." —Variety. "A sharp, snappy romantic comedy." —NY Times. "Hilarious. There are lots of belly laughs, thanks to playwright Daniel Goldfarb's ability to craft genuinely funny one-liners." —NY Post. "The place of conservatism in the modern world can be a polarizing topic. In MODERN ORTHODOX, Daniel Goldfarb's entertaining new play, it also happens to be a potent source of comedy…Goldfarb's writing hints at classic comedy films of the 1940s or 1950s, with some exchanges seeming as though they could have been written for Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn…" —Associated Press.    

Sarah, Sarah Comedy/Satire; Drama 4 (2m, 2f) View Details Compare
Short
Synopsis

In Toronto, 1961, Sarah Grosberg prepares tea she will serve to her future daughter-in-law, eighteen-year-old Rochelle Bloom. Vincent, her Polish housekeeper arrives, puts on his dress (he cleans in drag), and gets to work. Rochelle arrives, and Sarah begins questioning her. Sarah does not think she is good enough for her son, Artie. Rochelle is poor, her family has terrible genes, but worst of all, they live in a house but can't afford to pay for the wedding. Rochelle stands up for her family and for her love for Artie, whom she will support while he is finishing his philosophy degree. Philosophy? Sarah thinks her son is studying dentistry. Just then, Artie arrives. Sarah confronts him and demands that Rochelle give him his ring back. At this, Vincent interferes and confronts Sarah about her own past. She does not come from a rich, educated family in the old country but is an abandoned orphan. Sarah, broken and ashamed, begs Artie not to ever tell anyone her terrible secret. Act Two jumps forward forty years to the industrial city of Hefei, China, where Jeannie Grosberg, Sarah's single granddaughter has come with her father Arthur (Artie, all grown up) to adopt a baby, whom she will name Sarah, after her grandmother. After she gets the baby, she calls her mother and worriedly tells her that Sarah is sick and weak. Another couple, Miles and Maggie, goes to the orphanage and brings back information about Sarah. But Arthur will have nothing of it. He thinks that Jeannie should give the baby back. Late at night, Jeannie stands up to him, and Arthur finally accepts the baby as his granddaughter. On the Great Wall of China, Arthur speaks to Sarah about the woman she is named for. Sarah, from Act One, appears. Arthur tells his mother not to be ashamed. Sarah holds Sarah.

"Deftly written, a pleasure to watch. Mr. Goldfarb is an audience-friendly writer." —NY Times. "A comedy-drama of the first order, as moving as it is funny, exploring remote corners within the familiar, thus managing to be both readily recognizable and totally new—if your eyes remain dry, there must be something wrong with your lachrymal glands…An expert blend of humor and pathos, giving the four actors a chance to play quite different roles with equal expertise." —NY Magazine. "The playwright is a sensitive observer of the conflicting responsibilities of parenthood, and the way emotional burdens from childhood play out in adult lives, writing natural, understated dialogue that gently draws out the plays themes." —Variety. "A gently humorous, thoughtful and ultimately moving examination of how families are linked across generations and continents. Goldfarb's play covers a lot of miles, but it's emotionally grounded in a very small, personal space: the tender, yet often tempestuous relationships between parent and child."

—Associated Press.     

Showing 1 - 4 of 4
No. of results per page
First  |  Page  1  |   Last
Compare

Compare (up to 3 items)

Start
Comparison